Tag Archives: David Ortiz

David Ortiz Versus A-Rod…..I’m Just Sayin’

David Ortiz versus Alex Rodriguez

When I first started writing this blog, one of the first ideas that came to me was writing an offensive comparison of David Ortiz versus Alex Rodriguez. That post, which showed Ortiz’s versus A-Rod’s stats since 2004, struck a chord with Red Sox and Yankees fans alike. The numbers pretty much were a push, and I argued that given Ortiz’s postseason prowess, he should be declared the better offensive threat during that period. Yankees fans, unable to listen to reason, fought back. “We’ll see how Ortiz does once he’s off of steroids, I bet he’ll suck,” was the general sentiment. And Yankees fans chuckled after Ortiz had an absolutely abysmal start to the 2010 season. I could hear the “I told you so’s” echoing in my ears. Be patient, I told them. And here we have both Ortiz’s and A-Rod’s stats for 2010. The number of at bats they each had was nearly identical.

David Ortiz — .270 AVG, 32 HR, 102 RBI, 141 hits

A-Rod — .270 AVG, 30 HR, 125 RBI, 140 hits

Those numbers, once again, look frightening similar to me. Now I will certainly give A-Rod the edge, as 23 RBI’s is a significant difference. But you do have to factor in that A-Rod had people on base in front of him much more often than Papi did. Papi consistently had Marco Scutaro and a rotation of other scrubs hitting in front of him. That’s not an excuse, it’s a reality. Regardless, these two had very similar seasons at the plate. Ortiz was just fine “without his steroids.” Ironically, there is no more proof of Ortiz using steroids than there is of anyone who was making these statements using steroids, but that’s another issue and a bridge we’ve crossed all too often. Here’s an updated look at Ortiz and A-Rod’s stats, since 2004.

HR                     RBI                         AVG

David Ortiz                         260                     831                         .286

Alex Rodriguez                268                     841                          .296

Take it for what it is — Alex Rodriguez averages 1.1 more home runs and 1.4 RBI’s more than David Ortiz per season. Whose ears are echoing with “I told you so” now?

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The 2010 Boston Red Sox — Put a Fork in Em’

Pedroia Red Sox

This picture really shows how small Pedroia actually is, doesn't it?

This post has been a long time in coming, but alas, there is now no way to avoid it — the 2010 Red Sox are toast. Burnt. Finished. Done. As of writing this post the Sox have 30 games to play, and are 7 games off the wild card pace. Ain’t happening.

While many Boston writers wrote the Sox off as early as mid-July, I held out far longer than most. Yes, it’s partially cause I want to “believe.” But it’s not like good play couldn’t have gotten the Sox right back in it. At one point last week they were a mere 4.5 games out of first place in the AL East. But at this point, they are short on time, talent, and inspiration. As a fan its most disappointing to see that they couldn’t put a decent run together.

That being said, I can’t really feel surprised. This was certainly a very interesting season in many ways. If you had told me at the beginning of the year that the Red Sox would claim Johnny Damon off waivers and Clay Bucholz would lead the league in ERA I would have given you more markers to huff. Theo Epstein chose a defense and pitching strategy which seemed strange in the AL east, yet in resulted in one of baseball’s most potent offenses and a rather lackluster pitching staff.

At the end of the day, you can throw the excuse card at me all day long, but that would just be you making excuses — the Red Sox season was simply derailed by injuries.  At this point Dustin Pedroia has missed 58 games, while Kevin Youkilis has missed 31 and is out for the rest of the season. Both players were off to great starts. Jacoby Ellsbury, a key offensive piece, has missed 115 games. His defensive replacement, Mike Cameron, has missed over half of the season. Josh Beckett has pitched under 100 innings, and Victor Martinez missed 23 games — during which backup catcher Jason Varitek got injured and found himself on the disabled list. And that’s just the beginning of the Sox woes this season. I simply have never seen a string of injuries this severe, which is most disappointing. Nobody wants to see the baseball season end in September.

I am however happy that I feel like I can look forward to next season with a huge amount of optimism. Despite all of the injuries and widespread criticism of Theo Epstein’s pitching and defense strategy, the Red Sox are 16 games over .500. Imagine if they had stayed fairly healthy? Needless to say, they’d be right in it, if not on top. Kevin Youkilis, Dustin Pedroia, and David Ortiz are the heart and soul of this team, and 2/3 of that heart is missing. Imagine if A-Rod and Texiera were missing in New York? Or Longoria and Crawford in Tampa? It’s a scary thought. And I think Theo knows he better step up his game this offseason.

So who’s going to step up and beat the Yankees for me?

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Johnny Damon — Stay Out of Boston

Johnny Damon

As a matter of fact Johnny, stay out of Boston altogether. When the Tigers come to play Boston, take a few personal days. Nobody wants you here.

As a Red Sox fan (and a former Damon fan, I actually got his autograph at Fenway while he was on the Royals), I was not exactly happy to see that the Sox claimed Damon off of waivers from the Detroit Tigers. Luckily for me, Damon was a coward and feared the wrath of the Boston fans too much to return — he utilizes his no trade clause to stay with the Tigers. He said that his “psyche” was “absolutely” hurt by Boston fans — as it should be. The man proved to be a complete coward, a complete sellout. Damon “loved” playing for the Red Sox, helping them win their first World Series in 86 years. He talked about it for hours on end. He wanted to stay. Boston was his home. Then he sold out to the Yankees for minimally more money. Are you kidding me? Get out of here and never come back. Stay in Detroit and hit .270 with your 7 home runs. You do a pretty great job of defining disloyalty and greed.

Now that I’m done with Johnny, let’s lay into Theo Epstein a bit. Are you kidding me Theo? You wanted Damon back? Are you that desperate? I have always defended you, and think you are just about the wisest GM in baseball. But how could you let Damon come back to the Red Sox after his betrayal? Fans will literally hurl batteries at him and boo him out of Boston. Sure, we’ve got all kinds of injuries in the outfield — but let’s not stoop this low. I’d rather than lose than have Damon help us. Have some pride, Theo. For a GM known for his patience, for once it looks like you might be panicking.

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My All Generation Baseball Team — 1990-2010

Ivan RodriguezHere’s the lastest of my lists — My All Generation (1990-2010) Baseball Team. These are the players that aren’t necessarily the best, but the ones that are my favorites at each position. And yes, they tend to be awesome. Without further adieu…..

Starting Pitcher: Pedro Martinez — We’ll begin by dominating and confusing the hell out of you.

Middle Relief: Kerry Wood — The game that he struck out 20 hitters is the best pitched game I’ve ever seen.

Closer: Randy Johnson — And end by blowing it by you. Sure, Johnson’s not known as reliever, but he’s stepped up and done this before with great success.

Catcher: Ivan Rodriguez — He’s got 2800 hits and 13 gold gloves. One season he threw out 60% of runners who tried to steal on him, and he routinely threw out runners who took a large lead at either 1st or 3rd base. Easily the best defensive catcher ever and my favorite player as a kid.

First Base: Albert Pujols — How can I not pick him? I used to love Mo Vaughn, but he took steroids. It’s hard not to pick Youk here as well, but I can’t pick all Red Sox players and Pujols is one of the only power hitters of our generation who is not now villianized.

Second Base: Dustin Pedroia — There really aren’t many other good options that don’t spit on umpires or do advertisements for Tasty Cake Donuts. Maybe Jeff Frye? Joey Cora? Carlos Baerga?

Short Stop: Derek Jeter — He gets hits. He’s makes pitchers work way too hard. I can’t decide if he’s a good defender or not, but I’ve got a perfect place for him in this line-up. Honorable mention goes to John Valentin (27 home runs, 102 rbi’s in 1995).

Third Base: Mike Lowell — The man gets no respect — he’s a wonder at the plate and in the field. Here’s your respect Mike.

Left Field: Manny Ramirez — This team plays in Fenway (obviously), and he can play the Monster so I’ll bypass his defense (or lack thereof). We all know what he can do with the bat.

Center Field: Ken Griffey Jr. — He’s so fly. If I were a dog, I’d hump his leg.

Right Field: Jacoby Ellsbury — I wish I got to see more of Rickey Henderson, but my line-up needs some speed. I almost gave this one to Troy O’leary who in 1999 had 28 home runs and 103 rbi’s.

Designated Hitter: David Ortiz — If this team needed a hit, he’d get it.

Batting Order: (averages per 162 games)

  1.  Jacoby Ellsbury — .291 avg, 60 steals
  2.  Derek Jeter — .315, 207 hits
  3.  David Ortiz — .280, 36 home runs
  4.  Manny Ramirez — .313, 131 rbi’s
  5.  Albert Pujols — .332, 42 home runs
  6.  Ken Griffey Jr. — .284, 10 Gold gloves
  7.  Dustin Pedroia — .305, listed at 5’9″
  8.  Mike Lowell — .279, 1 World Series MVP
  9.  Ivan Rodriguez — .298, 46% of runners caught stealing

Who you got on your team? Check out http://chrisross91.wordpress.com.

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The Top 10 Baseball Hitters of My Generation

Ichiro Suzuki

Here it is: my highly anticipated list of the top 10 hitters of my generation. Once again, I’m defining my generation as 1990-2010 — players must have done the majority of their damage between these years to be eligible for the list.

Before we dive in, let’s make one thing clear — this is my list. That being said, I have chosen to not include any players that have been proven steroid users — they should all drop dead. Sorry Yankees fans, Jason Giambi can’t make this list. Neither can Mark McGwire. This is a country where you are innocent until proven guilty people. Deal with it. But because this is my list, we’re eliminating Barry Bonds as well. I mean, the circumference of his head grew an inch and a half and he was suddenly hitting 80 home runs a year. You get the point.

Here we go, in order.

1) Ichiro Suzuki — In his 9 seasons in the US, he’s won the batting title 6 times. He’s never hit under .300 and never had fewer than 200 hits in a season. He’s amassed 2200 hits in 9 years, averaging 229 hits per year and a .332 average. He flat out has better bat control than anyone, maybe ever.

2) Tony Gwynn — Tony won 8 batting titles, never hit under .300, and had a lifetime .338 average. He’s also in the 3000 hit club, with 3141 hits.

3) Albert Pujols — His 162 game averages are: .332, 42 home runs, and 128 RBI’s. Easily the best combination of average and power of my generation, Albert may ultimately go down as the best hitter ever. I pray to god that he never took steroids.

4) Manny Ramirez — Career 162 game averages of .313, 40 home runs, and 131 RBI’s. He’s had plenty of clutch post season hits, and might be the most difficult power hitter of my generation to get out.

5) Derek Jeter — One of baseball’s all-time clutch post season hitters, he has a career .315 average. 207 hits per 162 games played.

6) Ken Griffey Jr. — The sweetest swing I have ever seen, Griffey would have ended his career with about 875 home runs had he not been horribly plagued by injuries. He still ended up with 630 — not too shabby.

7) Albert Belle — This one may surprise you, but from 1991-2000 he might have been the best hitter in baseball. If you don’t believe me, go look at his numbers. Crazy.

8)David Ortiz — His power numbers from 2003-2010 are as good as anyone’s, but it’s David’s clutchness in the post season that gets him on this list. He almost personally delivered the Red Sox their first World Series title in 86 years in 2004, then did it again in 2007. A fun fact? In 2005 he hit 20 home runs that either tied or won games for the Sox.

9) Frank Thomas — A .301 average and 521 home runs have to be good for something, right?

10) Mark Grace — Another sleeper, there is no way you would have had Mark Grace on your list. But that is why howiGit’s blog is the better than any other. Grace led all players in the 90’s in hits, doubles, and sac flys — all hallmarks (no pun intended) of a great hitter.

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Ortiz Wins Home Run Derby Crown — A Beast As Always

It has long been known to Boston fans that David Ortiz eats babies — and he proved last night that despite unwarranted criticism from New York fans trying to make themselves feel better about A-Rod, he’s got as much power as ever. Ortiz slugged 32 home runs to win the 2010 Home Run Derby crown, displaying  power that has led him 18 home runs, 57 RBI’s, and a .263 average this season. As for A-Rod, he’s at .269, 14 HR’s, and 70 RBI’s. A-Rod’s numbers have also come while playing 8 more games and earning $20 million more than Ortiz — this season.

Let’s now take a look at a comment from a New York fan (there are many), in response to my David Ortiz vs. A-Rod post in March.

“as an avid yankee fan, a reasonable one of course, i think Papi’s “off” year last year was due to the fact that he took steroids came out and he there fore was no longer on the juice. As everyone knows last year was also A-rods first year playing after being outed as a steroid user and he seemed fine. We will see this year if this plays a part in Papi’s drop in performance.”

Looks like we’ve seen, looks like you were wrong. Sorry.

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